In Utah, the word Promontory has a special meaning, as it often relates to Promontory Summit, where the First Transcontinental Railroad in the United States was officially completed on May 10, 1869. It was there the railheads of the Union Pacific and the Central Pacific railroads finally came together, combining east and west at Promontory Summit in Northern Utah.

But to the developer Francis Najafi, the meaning of the word had a more symbolic context. Though it also defined a joining of east and west, it also defined a joining of nature and nurture, of family gathering and family solace. These were the roots of Mr. Najafi’s vision that became the foundation of the luxury multi-generational resort development, Promontory Club. Recently, we visited Promontory Club and observed how this vision was operationalized, as we experienced the winter identity of this exceptional place.

The Promontory Club, Equestrian area

We arrived late in the day, and our first view was one of a place of quiet, with panoramas of the Uinta mountains covered in powdery snow. Near our residence, deer and elk herds walked the areas, untroubled by our presence. We watched them meander near our balcony in the pink, early-fading winter light. Later that evening, and on our balcony, we heard the bugling of the elk, a wistful, winter refrain, synchronized under a rare, full, blue moon.

The Vision for a Family-Centric Luxury Resort

Promontory covers over 6,400 acres of land at elevations ranging from 6,500 to 7,400 feet above sea level. Since its debut over a decade ago, Promontory has grown, with an investment of over $400 million, with memorable activities and experiences for all ages, as Mr. Najafi also had the idea of legacy in mind.

He explained this to us, saying, ” “I looked at many land parcels before I saw where Promontory would be built, and none suited my vision of a family-centric luxury resort. Because of my background, I believe that family is the most precious gift we have, and the times spent with family lasts forever in memory. My vision was to have a place where families could live, and take part, no matter what season, in sport, educational activity, see animals in their natural habitat, swim, ski, golf, ride horses, enjoy every day together, all the time building memories that become the gift of legacy given from one family to their children, and from those children to their children.”

The Promontory Club, art studio
The Promontory Club, private estates, Painted Shores

Activities for All Seasons

So, the all-season activities and the amenities at Promontory Club define an aura of worth and seamlessness only luxury products have. A few examples: in winter, members enjoy their private Alpine Ski Lodge in Silver Lake Village at Deer Valley, minutes away; on the Promontory property, a kids-only clubhouse that offers supervised activities and crafts, as well as an adventure trail, tree house, and exploration cave; the Ranch Clubhouse features tennis, swimming in separate family and adult lap pools, ice-skating in the winter, a fitness center, and a full-service spa facility. Promontory’s Equestrian Center offers heated stalls, private tack rooms, a private member viewing area and indoor/outdoor arenas for the member’s horses and Promontory’s horses.

The Promontory Club, sunset on the pond

The Shed Clubhouse is an addition to Promontory’s Ranch Club and features bowling lanes, a movie theater and arts and crafts studio. The studio, built with floor to ceiling windows, so those who are creating can have view inspiration also, allows members and children to create their own ceramics, paintings and sculptures and drawings.

In three of the four seasons, the two golf courses, now covered in a snow patina, move through the resort’s land. The Pete Dye Canyon and the Jack Nicklaus Painted Valley Courses are played in spring, summer and fall.

The Promontory Club, Shed Clubhouse

But with all of the activities, what our visit allowed us to remember was the unique pleasure to again know the importance of living with nature in a peaceful manner. Those who live here do not disturb the wildlife, drive slowly on the streets both day and night. It is also part of the essence of the area as the Promontory Conservancy, a critical dimension of the resort identity has allotted over 60% of the land to be protected as natural open space for wildlife preservation.

A Legacy of Nature, Nurture and Inspired Luxury Living

So, it is here that nature and nurture combine to allow both a luxury community for humans and a conservation community for wildlife – a unique, balanced symbiosis. High-end homes, usually ranging in price between two and twenty-five million, are built here by a cadre of world-class architects and designers, sensitive to the space needed for wildlife, and human life as well.

Finally, in addition to the sense of permanence due to Mr. Najafi’s vision of family legacy, the membership here can also have a unique legacy dimension also, as it can be transferred from generation to generation if desired. The membership can also be inherited, as upon the passing of a member, the membership can be transferred in a will to a family member who also owns property at Promontory.

The Promontory Club, skyward, (c) Susan Kime

As we were leaving Promontory, we were stopped short by an elk who stepped in front of our car and just looked at us. Not a deer in the headlights look, but rather, a what are you doing here on my path? look. We just waited quietly for this four-legged pedestrian to pass. After awhile, he walked into the fields, and slowly, we drove on. In winter and summer, he had priority: this was his land, but we felt joy in sharing.

To learn more and for booking, visit www.promontoryclub.com

 

Author

Susan Kime’s career combines travel/adventure writing, blogging, and editing, both print and virtual. She was the Destination Club/Fractional Update for Elite Traveler, and senior club news correspondent for Robb Report’s Vacation Homes. She has published in Stratos, Luxury Living, European CEO, The London Telegraph, and ARDA Developments. She was the Editor-in-Chief of Travel Connoisseur, and the senior Luxury journalist for Luxist/AOL.com. She also wrote 95% of architecture/design articles for Urban Arches, a high-end arch/design website. She has written for JustLuxe.com, Pursuitist, JamesEdition, Joe’s Daily, About.com, Caviar Affair, and DestinationLuxury. She has a B.A. in English/Humanities and an M.A. in Counseling Psychology with two additional psychology certifications. She has taught Program Evaluation and Research Design at Chapman University, and has written extensively on affluence research. When not traveling, she resides with her Canadian husband and peaceful Beagle in northern Utah.

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