Author

Butchoff Antiques Team

Browsing

The various features of furniture sometimes have practical and straightforward names, words that are easily understood. If a chair has four curved ‘legs’, or ‘arms’ that are covered in upholstery, we know what that means. We can associate those words with features on objects in our own home and easily visualise what that chair may look like, without seeing it. However, many other terms used to describe the anatomy and physical characteristics of furniture and decorative objects do not relate to everyday words or aspects of the human form like legs and arms. Rather, they draw from Classical architecture, ancient art techniques, and languages such as Latin or French. It is these terms that define what is special about a particular object and help distinguish its individuality and fine craftsmanship. Allow the images below to aid you in connecting meanings to such names.  —– Asian Influence —– Chinoiserie The word…

The neoclassical style was a late eighteenth-century European movement in the decorative arts that embraced a revival of ancient principles derived from the classical Roman and Greek architecture. In England neoclassicism is also known as the ‘Adam Style’, named for two brothers, Robert and James Adam, who created ingenious designs and decorative interiors for English houses, some of which remain today, such as Kedleston Hall, Harewood, Kenwood, and Syon houses. Delicacy, Gaiety, Grace and Beauty It was during Robert Adam’s four years of architecture training in Italy that he was greatly influenced by the interior decoration of private Roman interiors, and the ‘delicacy, gaiety, grace and beauty’ of their ornamentation. He translated this inspiration into his own distinctive ideal, establishing a complete harmony of exterior and interior decoration. Adam closely studied and drew antique examples, objects and wall paintings found in recent excavations at Herculaneum and Pompeii, and illustrations from…